Beating occupational cancer together: our action plan

Asbestos fibres, diesel fumes, silica dust and mineral oils – just a few of the 50-plus workplace
substances linked to cancer. For millions of people across the world, working with these
carcinogens is a reality of their daily job.

Many sectors and countries have already stopped or limited exposures to hazardous substances, but much more needs to be done. We can beat occupational cancer if we work together to control the exposure risks.

Whether you’re an employer or employee, industry body or policy-maker, safety and health professional or occupational hygienist, we all have a part to play if we want to call time on work-caused cancers. That’s why, as part of its No Time to Lose campaign, IOSH is:

  • commissioning or supporting research into occupational cancer, to find out more about causes, incidence rates and prevention strategies
  • working with policy-makers globally to promote policies to raise awareness and encourage cutting exposure to carcinogens at work
  • supporting a multidisciplinary drive across sectors to raise awareness, share knowledge and engage employees in solutions
  • inviting organisations to make a commitment to introduce policies and practices to manage the risks associated with carcinogens at work
  • encouraging businesses to design-in exposure prevention measures, through responsible procurement, design, manufacture and supply
  • helping employees take the opportunity to better understand the risks and demonstrate good practice in their work.

Safety Groups UK logo 

"Safety Groups UK is happy to support the IOSH campaign on occupational cancer. It’s vital to get the message out about this significant occupational health issue – not only for those individuals and families directly affected, but also from the perspective of business, and the national economy as a whole."

John Cairns
Chairman

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Wates logo 

"We're pleased to back IOSH's No Time to Lose campaign, welcoming its focus on the serious occupational health issue of carcinogenic exposures."

Neil Edmunds
Group Health and Safety Director

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